Sunday, May 31, 2015

Justice...Elie Wiesel

“There may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest.”

- Elie Wiesel, Writer, 1986 Nobel Prize Winner, 1992 Presidential Medal of Freedom, Congressional Geld Medal 




Saturday, May 30, 2015

Friday, May 29, 2015

Successfully Accomplishing Your Goals...Harvey MacKay

It doesn't matter whether you are pursuing success in business, sports, the arts, or life in general: The bridge between wishing and accomplishing is discipline.

--Harvey Mackay


Tuesday, May 26, 2015

#LeadershipTuesdays: Leadership Is...Bill Bradley

"Leadership is unlocking people's potential to become better." 

--Bill Bradley, American Hall of Fame Basketball Player, Rhodes Scholar, and Politician





 
Every other Tuesday, WOMEN AT LIBERTY provides a platform for a variety of voices and resources to develop, encourage, and strengthen women leaders. Today's Leadership Tuesdays' features is an article which appeared on Elle.com entitled, "Why Lady Bosses Are the Best" by Jessica Grose. Often women leaders take on their roles and immediately have to combat long-held stereotypes. Since yesterday was Memorial Day, I am reminded of the military movie starring Meg Ryan and Denzel Washington, Courage Under Fire.  When a soldier (Lou Diamond Phillips) under Captain Karen Emma Walden's (portrayed by Meg Ryan) command wanted to criticize her leadership, he resorted to all of the cliches about women leaders:  she was emotional because she cried; she was scared because the soldier disagreed with her tactical decisions about an incident.

When both men and women state that they 'prefer male bosses', as quoted in a 2014 Gallup Poll referenced in the above article, it makes you wonder how much these cliches affected their opinions of those who answered the survey about women leaders/bosses. This article suggests that how women leaders are depicted in movies, TV shows and popular culture affects how we feel about women leaders/bosses.

The writer, Jessica Grose, uses her own experiences with two prominent female leaders to refute the myths that women are not good bosses.  She attributes their leadership example as being key to her own development and growth in her career.  

This article is worth the read because it gives a reference of examples where women led by example and how you can use their experience as a reference to develop your own leadership style.

To read today's article click here or go to: Women Making History Facebook page (article posted on the date of this blog).  For more information on Leadership Tuesdays or WOMEN AT LIBERTYclick here. 

V. Nona Ogunsula 

Friday, May 22, 2015

Learning To Be Great!...Kristi Yamaguchi

"I learned to put 100 percent into what you're doing. I learned about setting goals for yourself, knowing where you want to be and taking small steps toward those goals. I learned about adversity and how to get past it."

--Kristi Yamaguchi

Kristi Yamaguchi,  1992 Winter Olympics Figure Skater
kristiyamaguchi.com


Thursday, May 21, 2015

Your Main Capital...Ernest Hemmingway

I still need more healthy rest in order to work at my best.  My health is the main capital I have and I want to administer it intelligently.

Ernest Hemingway

 

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Advice For Those In Leadership...Joyce Meyer

“(On being in a position of leadership) Even if it's your dog, you've got authority over somebody. Start treating him better.”

--Joyce Meyer (http://www.joycemeyer.org/)



Every other Tuesday, WOMEN AT LIBERTY provides a platform for a variety of voices and resources to develop, encourage, and strengthen women leaders. Today's Leadership Tuesdays' blog features the article, "3 Keys For Bringing Out The Best In People" by Michael Beck. This article aptly brings leaders back to the fundamentals of effectively leading people with this quote:
"When a leader regards the members of their team as people, they acknowledge that everyone - regardless of position or tenure - has hopes and dreams, fears and stresses.  They understand that people generally want to do a good job.  And when results aren't what the leader expects, he or she addresses the issue as one person to another, rather than to dish out a "scolding" or respond in a manner which treats people simply as an "asset" or a "resource".  In effect, good leaders treat people like they themselves want to be treated."
When things are not going well in an organization and goals are not being met, it is easy to forget that people are the most valuable part of an organization.  This article reminds us of that with three simple keys.  

To learn what those keys are, read the article by clicking here. For more information on Leadership Tuesdays or WOMEN AT LIBERTY, click here. 

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Protesting: A Means To An End...Cheryl J. Sanders


“Protest of injustice is a good and necessary thing, but you need to have an alternative in mind. You can’t just tear stuff down. You need to have an inkling of what is possible.”*

--Rev. Dr. Cheryl J. Sanders,  Professor of Christian Ethics, Howard University School of Divinity. Senior Pastor Third Street Church of God, Washington, D.C. 





*To read the article from which this quote was taken, "Dr. Cheryl Sanders’ Seven Leadership Lessons to Take from MLK’s Legacy", by Sharon Hong (1/23/14), go to:



“Protest of injustice is a good and necessary thing, but you need to have an alternative in mind,” she said. “You can’t just tear stuff down. You need to have an inkling of what is possible.” - See more at: http://fuller.edu/about/news-and-events/articles/2014/dr--cheryl-sanders--seven-leadership-lessons-to-take-from-mlk-s-legacy/#sthash.2Y78VmCm.dpuf
“Protest of injustice is a good and necessary thing, but you need to have an alternative in mind,” she said. “You can’t just tear stuff down. You need to have an inkling of what is possible.” - See more at: http://fuller.edu/about/news-and-events/articles/2014/dr--cheryl-sanders--seven-leadership-lessons-to-take-from-mlk-s-legacy/#sthash.2Y78VmCm.dpuf
“Protest of injustice is a good and necessary thing, but you need to have an alternative in mind,” she said. “You can’t just tear stuff down. You need to have an inkling of what is possible.” - See more at: http://fuller.edu/about/news-and-events/articles/2014/dr--cheryl-sanders--seven-leadership-lessons-to-take-from-mlk-s-legacy/#sthash.2Y78VmCm.dpuf